Open This Only If You Have Had A Bad Review for Your Business

Bad Online Reviews Suck!

No one likes to see a bad review about their business. But for even the best of us, some customers will leave a negative review, deserved or not.

It can be frustrating, and costly!

The only real answer is to bury a bad review with good ones.

That is why you need to develop a strategy to get your existing happy customers to post positive 5 star reviews for you.

Here is a quick video that explains what I think is the best system on the market to do just that.

This powerful Reputation Building system starts with a free  no obligation trial.

How is that for confidence?  Prove to yourself that it works, before you need to plunk down even a single dime.

Reviews can make or break your business. And their role is growing daily.

92% of consumers read online business reviews and 33% do so on a regular basis.

Once you have this system up and operating, it will cut back on the number of bad reviews. But if one gets through anyway, your constant stream of good reviews will bury it quickly.

Plus, people understand that errors can happen, and that sometimes the people complaining are just having a bad day themselves.  This is especially true when they see that you have dozens and dozens of positive reviews.

And that is a good thing.

One that will keep new customers coming, and your cash register ringing.

Get Started Building Your Positive Reputation Now

Get RepPilot’s Review Velocity today

http://reppilot.com/info/review-velocity-free-trial/ 

 

 

Your 2017 Local SEO Strategy – What is Missing?

Chances are pretty good that your next new customer will come from a customer journey that included an internet search rather than a stroll past your storefront window.  A diversified local SEO strategy puts your business where new customers can find it in the exact moment they are making a buying decision.

2017 Local SEO Strategy Google Search

You already know how critical ranking high in local search is for the growth of your business.

(If you don’t, read Local SEO Checklist: 9 Basic Tips to Get Found in Local Search)

You probably already have some form of local SEO strategy worked out.

(If you don’t, read Local SEO in 2017 – How to Rank Higher in Local Search). 

What do you need to add to your 2017 Local SEO Strategy to improve your visibility in local search results and conversions from your local digital marketing?

Adjust Marketing Budget to Focus on Mobile

As mobile search surpassed desktop searches, studies show that 70% or more of your traffic will come from mobile.  With a lower return on investment from print advertising, marketing dollars are better spent on mobile SEO and the digital advertising that puts your business in front of qualified shoppers.

Your mobile advertising (including SEO) spend should be proportionate to your mobile revenue.  To get that number you will need to track sales, clicks, and conversions from mobile local search whether they occur in-store or on the phone.  Mobile user analytics help you determine the right budget for improved R.O.I.

mobile-optimization-local-search-reputationloop

Watch out for the ramp up for Google’s mobile-first index as it shows that in 2017 mobile-friendly websites and content will soon be the only competitors for the top spots in search engine results. First use Google’s Mobile-Friendly Test Tool to see if Google considers your website mobile-friendly. Then ensure you’ve applied local optimization to your mobile pages.

What can you do right now to improve your mobile 2017 local search strategy?

  • Add meta tags to mobile web pages telling users your page is mobile ready
  • Use concise titles and descriptions on mobile pages with terms mobile users search for
  • Use schema markup to identify the page and content as a local business.
  • Include conversions that mobile user search for like contact information, driving directions, hours, maps, coupons, local landmarks like shopping center or mall name, and links to apps

Build and Maintain Accurate Local Business Listings & Citations

If your business has been established for over a year, then your locations are already listed in hundreds of local directories, networks, and websites. Search engines and search engine users are relying on these listings to find your business and verify your contact information. It is vital that your business listings are accurate and consistent across the web to avoid lower rankings and confusion with shoppers making split-second decisions on which business to choose.

Since these business listings and citations are an important part of your business’ online presence, Business Listing Management needs to be part of your local SEO strategy. With thousands of directories and networks out there, it’s time to automate the process of building and monitoring your business listings and citation.

Business Listing Stats

ALSO READ: The What, Why, and How of Business Listings and Citations

Adjust Local SEO Strategy for Growing Voice Search Audience

Google Voice Search allows you to use Google Search by speaking.  It’s a hands-free way to get the information you are searching for faster. When you are in a hurry or driving, voice search is a handy mobile tool to find local results for your immediate needs.  Google CEO Sundar Pichai announced in May 2016 that 20 percent of searches on its mobile app and Android devices were voice searches.

Google Voice Search is growing, and you can get a jump on the competition with local optimization tactics to rank higher in search results.  Note that voice search queries are more action-based than typed queries.  Meaning (in a simplified generality) we do more voice search to accomplish something, and we do more typed searches to learn something.

Local Optimization for Google Voice Search includes:

  • Using natural conversational language in your site’s local content
  • Ensuring your website is crawlable and indexed by Google
  • Optimizing local language in Google My Business and Business Listings

ALSO READ: How to Optimize Google My Business Listing

Improving your 2017 Local SEO Strategy

When the customers who buy your products or services are located in your geographical area, a local SEO strategy is a must.  It ensures you optimize for local search which makes up around 50% of search queries on mobile phones and tablets.  Build a more comprehensive 2017 local SEO strategy to keep up with the changes in search engine marketing so you can meet customers where they start their shopping – online.

Free Demo RepLoop

Zach_Color_Trans_small_CroppedAbout The Author

Zach Anderson is the co-founder of Reputation Loop (helping small businesses grow by generating customer feedback and online reviews) who loves online marketing and golf.

The post Your 2017 Local SEO Strategy – What is Missing? appeared first on Reputation Loop.

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New Google My Business Features for 2017

Review these new Google My Business Features to ensure your Google My Business listing are complete and accurate.

Complete and accurate Google My Business listings bring customers to the storefronts and websites of your business and there are new Google My Business listings to explore. By optimizing your Google My Business listing, you can expect higher ranking in local search, an increased click-through-rate to your business website, and a better search (and find) experience for the user. A search user, if you can rank high, is likely to become your next customer.

optimize google my business local seoALSO READ: How to Optimize Your Google My Business Listing

Looking at the new Google My Business features, you’ll find opportunities to build more complete listings for your business and more insight into how customers are engaging with your listings.

Here are new Google My Business Features for 2017:

Insights Now Available for Your Google My Business Photos

New Google My Business Features InsightsThe “Photos” section of your My Google Business insights now shows the number of photos associated with your listing.  You’ll also see how often your photos were viewed compared to photos of businesses similar to yours.

The lines on the graphs compare your photo data with photo data for businesses like yours.  If you manage a restaurant, your business would be compared to other restaurants in your area. If there aren’t enough businesses like yours nearby, you might not see any comparisons on the graph.

A “Photo views” graph shows the number of times your photos have been viewed by Google users. The “Photo quantity” graph shows the number of photos uploaded by you.

The drop-down menu in the top left corner lets you adjust the timeframe and see data from the last 7, 30, or 90 days. To see data for a specific day only, hover over that day on the graph.

Edit Attributes for Your Business All at Once

The Google My Business platform has expanded its attributes for your business.  Next time you log in you may be asked to update options such as “Has Wi-Fi” to show customers more about your business.

You can review and edit all these attributes at once from your dashboard by accepting all Google attribute updates.  Once you complete your initial review, you will have fewer attributes to review when you log in for routine maintenance.

You can accept, discard or edit Google updates for multiple locations by following these instructions from Google:

  1. Sign in to Google My Business.
  2. Click Google updates at the top of the page. You won’t see this option if you don’t have Google updates to review. 
  3. Select an option from the drop-down menu to filter your updates by individual fields like Hours or Address, or select All to manage all updated locations.
  4. Click the box next to “Store code” to select all of your locations, or click the boxes next to individual locations you’d like to manage. 
  5. A toolbar will appear at the top of the page. Click an icon in the toolbar to manage your Google updates:
    •  Edit updates individually. Your original business information is listed on the left, and the updated information on the right. Click Submit when you’re done editing.
    •  Accept updates for the selected locations. The updated information will continue to appear live on Google. 
      • In the window that appears, you’ll see a list of updates that you’re about to accept. You can uncheck the boxes next to updates you don’t want to accept.
      • Click Accept when you’re done.
    •  Discard updates for the selected locations. The information will revert to the last values you entered, and will overwrite the Google-updated information. 
      • In the window that appears, you’ll see a list of updates that you’re about to discard. You can uncheck the boxes next to updates you don’t want to discard.
      • Click Discard when you’re done.

You may not be able to accept or discard Google updates in bulk if:

Using Bulk Upload

If you’re updating locations using your bulk upload spreadsheet, you can import your locations without resolving Google updates. Keep in mind that:

  • If you import a spreadsheet and you haven’t changed a particular field since your last upload, Google My Business will ignore that field. Your data won’t be changed, and Google updates for that field won’t be accepted or discarded. 
  • If you import a spreadsheet and you have changed a field, the new field value will be accepted and will overwrite both your old value and any Google update associated with it.

Add a Menu or List of Services to Your Google My Business Listing

There are two kinds of menus you can add to your Google My Business listing.

  1. A menu for eating or drinking establishments.
  2. A list of services for a business like a spa or repair shop that lists a complete set of services.

New Google My Business Features MenusMenus must follow these guidelines from Google:

  • The menu should be representative of the items and services that are available for customers at the business. Full menus can be meal-specific (like breakfast, lunch, or dinner) and have links to other menu pages. For example, you may choose to link to your business’s dinner menu, which in turn may include links to the breakfast and lunch menus.
  • Sample menus that only list “popular items” (or similar excerpts) should not be submitted.
  • Menu URLs can’t be direct links to third-party ordering or delivery services.
  • Third parties that manage listings on behalf of clients must notify and have the consent of the business owner to submit a menu URL for a business.

New Google My Business API Gives You Location Insights

Developers who write applications to manage Google My Business data sign up for the Google My Business API.  With the API they build applications that interact with your business location information on the Google My Business server. If you are a small business owner, this won’t mean anything to you.  If you are a small piece of a larger, tech-savvy company you may want to ask about using the Google My Business API to automate actions such as:

  • Editing location information
  • Reading and responding to customer reviews
  • Viewing insights for locations
  • Subscribing to push notifications for new customer reviews
  • Adding photos
  • Providing additional attributes for locations (like a restaurant’s menu URL, and whether it serves brunch)
  • Inviting and removing managers
  • Managing service-area businesses

Complete and Accurate Google My Business Listings Are Key to Ranking in Google Search Results

Complete Google My Business listings influence search engine user behavior so it is important to maintain, review and update your listings as Google rolls out new features and updates.  These new Google My Business features give you an opportunity to build a more user friendly and informative listing that draws more customers.

ALSO READ: Google Local SEO Ranking Factors for Small Business

Google likes to keep things in-house as much as possible, so it favors its own accurate and current business listings when giving local search results to its users. More importantly, if you want any chance of showing up in the Local 3-Pack which prominently displays the top three most relevant results for local search, you have to verify and optimize your Google My Business listing (preferably with dozens of five-star reviews).

Free Demo RepLoop

Zach_Color_Trans_small_CroppedAbout The Author

Zach Anderson is the co-founder of Reputation Loop (helping small businesses grow by generating customer feedback and online reviews) who loves online marketing and golf.

The post New Google My Business Features for 2017 appeared first on Reputation Loop.

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via IFTTT From Our Associates at Reputation Loop

Google Voice Search – Rank Higher with Local Optimization

Google Voice Search is growing and you can get a jump on the competition with local optimization tactics to rank higher in search results.  Google CEO Sundar Pichai announced in May 2016 that 20 percent of searches on its mobile app and Android devices were voice searches.  Additionally, surveys show significant increases in virtual assistant app and voice search usage in the past 12 months.

People have become more conversational with search, especially on mobile devices, as virtual assistants such as Siri, Cortana, Google Voice Search, Echo, and Google Home become more popular.  As voice search becomes more mainstream, we’ve seen voice search grow faster than typed search. Further growth is expected as people rely more on voice searches to multi-task while using a hands-free search tool and talking on or to their phone in public and in groups becomes more acceptable.

What is Google Voice Search and Why It’s Important in Local Search?

Google Voice Search allows you to use Google Search by speaking.  It’s a hands-free way to get the information you are searching for faster. When you are in a hurry or driving, voice search is a handy mobile tool to find local results for your immediate needs.

We’ve all at least toyed with the voice search on our devices.  The inaccuracy of voice recognition has been the “funny” in thousands of comedy skits. But as each improvement to Google Voice Search rolls out the speech recognition error rate has been reduced from 25% two years ago to 8% today.

google-voice-search-future-of-search

And the future of Google Voice Search looks poised for further growth as they move beyond voice recognition to actually “understanding” what the user is looking for.  Expect improvements and changes that foster a deeper understanding by looking at location-based context, context based on frequently used apps, previous searches, and keyword research based on spoken queries.

Local Optimization for Google Voice Search

Data analysis has shown that voice search queries are more action-based than typed queries.  Meaning (in a simplified generality) we do more voice search to accomplish something, and we do more typed searches to learn something.  “Where is the closest dentist?” and “What’s the best ice cream in Dallas?” are the kinds of queries driving ready-to-buy customers to local businesses. So how do you make sure your business shows up as a top option in voice search results?

local-seo-ranking-factors-vist-store-todayUse Natural Language in Your Sites Local Content

Take a quick look at your Google Search Console report to see what queries bring people to your site. Then think about the way customers search for your products or services?  If they asked a friend, used one of their virtual assistant apps, or Google Voice Search, what words would they use?  That is the natural language that needs to be part of the content of your website.  Headers such as “Looking for the cheapest flooring in Kansas City? KC Floors & More has it!” are likely to match the conversational queries that are used in voice search.

An even better way to weave natural language into your site content is with a Q&A page or section on major pages that asks and answers the questions customers would use in voice search queries.  This makes it easy for search engines to deliver your website as a top option in search results.

ALSO READ: Website Pages that Increase Local Search Visibility

Ensure Your Sites is Crawl-able and Indexed by Google

You can’t win if you aren’t in the game.  For your site’s contents to be included in search results it needs to be included in the Google index. The Google index is similar to an index in a library, but instead of books, the Google index lists all of the web pages that Google knows about. To see which pages on your site are in the Google index, you can do a Google Web Search for “site:mywebsite.com.” If you want more pages included in the Google index, you can create and submit a Sitemap through Webmaster Tools.

ALSO READ: Local SEO Checklist: 9 Basic Tips to Get Found in Local Search

ALSO READ: Structuring Your Website for Better Local Search Ranking

Do Local Optimization with Google My Business and Business Listings

local-seo-ranking-factors-google-my-business

Google likes to push the “near me” feature, and it’s very handy when doing a map search or voice search. It shows up immediately in auto-populate drop downs for many queries.  For your business, this drives purchase-minded customers directly to your door when they simply click “Navigate.”  You are not going to show up in Google Voice Search “near me” results if you have not claimed and optimized your Google My Business listing.

ALSO READ: How to Optimize Google My Business Listing

Additionally, it is crucial that you manage your online business listings to ensure that your NAP (name, address, and phone) are consistent, accurate, and prevalent across the web.  Your business listings help support the legitimacy and precise location of your business with search engines and search engine users.  So not only do they bolster your ranking in Google voice search results, but in all search results as apps, virtual assistants, and smaller search engines search for the best results to give their users.

ALSO READ: The What, Why, and How of Business Listings and Citations

The Future is Now with Google Voice Search

As voice search grows, you can ensure that your business is showing up when customers are ready to buy, no matter where they are.  Google, Microsoft, and Apple are all investing big on making voice search the first search, and by optimizing now, you can be at the forefront of the fastest growing tool for consumers searching for local businesses.

Free Demo RepLoop

Zach_Color_Trans_small_CroppedAbout The Author

Zach Anderson is the co-founder of Reputation Loop (helping small businesses grow by generating customer feedback and online reviews) who loves online marketing and golf.

The post Google Voice Search – Rank Higher with Local Optimization appeared first on Reputation Loop.

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via IFTTT From Our Associates at Reputation Loop

LOCAL CONSUMER REVIEW SURVEY: Customers Will Leave Review If Asked

Latest 2016 survey results show that 7 out of 10 consumers will leave a review if they are asked to, and 50% of consumers have actually left a review when asked to.

As more and more consumers continue to seek out and rely on online reviews, it is clear to see that building and promoting a stellar online reputation is crucial to the success and growth of local businesses.  Using online reviews consumers are able to bypass the most time-consuming part of the buying process – research.  With very little time and effort they can get the information they need at a glance with star ratings on search engines and review sites.

There is no denying that it is imperative for a local business to have an active reputation marketing strategy to build a positive online reputation.  Businesses with five-star reputations are ranking higher in search, being found faster in “near me” search results, and beating out competitors who are not promoting the social proof found in star ratings and online reviews that consumers are looking for.

2016 Local Consumer Review Survey Shows Increase in Use of Online Customer Reviews

Recently BrightLocal released its latest local consumer review survey with new data for 2016 showing substantial year over year growth in the number of consumers who are reading and relying on online reviews to guide their purchasing decisions.

If you are running a local business, there are four standout results that you should pay attention to:

  • 7 out of 10 consumers will leave a review if they’re asked to
  • 84% people trust online reviews as much as a personal recommendation (vs. 80% in 2015)
  • 54% of people will visit the website after reading positive reviews (vs. 48% in 2015)
  • Star rating is still the #1 factor used by consumers to judge a business

Key Findings for Local Business from BrightLocal’s 2016 Local Consumer Review Survey

Since 2010 BrightLocal has conducted the Local Consumer Review Survey with a focus on reviews for local business and exploring how consumers read and use online reviews. By surveying thousands of consumers, they are able to gather the data small businesses, marketers and search engine optimizers need to prioritize reputation marketing with customer reviews.

Below is a snapshot of survey questions and results from the 2016 Local Consumer Review Survey giving the most insight on how local businesses benefit from online reviews and a positive reputation:

Have you ever been asked by a business to leave an online review for them?

  1. Yes, and I left a review for them
  2. Yes, but I didn’t leave a review for them
  3. No, I’ve never been asked

Key Findings

  • 7 out of 10 consumers will leave a review if they’re asked to
  • 50% of consumers have been asked to leave a review about a business and actually left a review
  • 20% of consumers asked to leave a review did NOT leave a review for that business

local-consumer-review-survey-askDo you read online reviews to determine whether a local business is good or bad?

  1. Yes, regularly
  2. Yes, occasionally
  3. No

Key Findings

  • More people are reading reviews on a regular basis (50% vs. 33% in 2015)
  • 91% of consumers regularly or occasionally read online reviews
  • Only 9% of consumers don’t read online reviews (vs. 29% in 2010)

In the last 12 months have you reviewed/recommended a local business to people you know by any of the following methods?

  1. Word of Mouth
  2. Facebook
  3. Twitter
  4. Yelp
  5. TripAdvisor
  6. Google
  7. Other Review Sites
  8. Directly on Business Website

Key Findings

  • Word of mouth is still the most popular way to recommend a local business (68%)
  • 47% of consumers recommended a local business on Facebook (vs. only 17% in 2015)
  • Google has seen an increase of 9% over the 2015 numbers
  • The user of Twitter to recommend a business jumped to 21% (vs. 6% in 2015)

local-consumer-review-survey-methodsWhen you read positive reviews for a business, what is the typical next step you take?

  1. Visit their website
  2. Visit the business
  3. Contact the business
  4. Search for more reviews to validate choice
  5. Continue searching for other businesses

Key Findings

  • 54% of people will visit the website after reading positive reviews (vs. 48% in 2015)
  • 19% will visit the business directly (down from 23% in 2015)
  • 17% will continue to search for reviews about the business (Note: This is a new answer in the 2016 survey)

local-consumer-review-survey-next-stepsHow many times have you used the internet to find/search for a local business in the last 12 months?

  1. Never
  2. 1 time
  3. 2 to 5 times
  4. 6 to 10 times
  5. Every month
  6. Every week
  7. Multiple times per week
  8. Everyday

Key Findings

  • 53% of consumers search for local businesses at least one time per month (vs. 43% in 2015)
  • 69% of consumers search for a local business at least 6 times per year (vs. 60% in 2015)
  • Only 5% said they never searched for local businesses online (vs. 9% in 2015)

When judging a local business on its reviews, which of these factors do you pay most attention to?

  1. Overall star rating
  2. Sentiment of reviews
  3. Recency of reviews
  4. Quantity of reviews
  5. Length and detail of reviews
  6. If a business has responded to reviews

Key Findings

  • 58% of consumers pay most attention to overall star rating
  • Sentiment of reviews is the second most important factor at 47%
  • The recency of reviews is also important, coming in third at 41%

local-consumer-review-survey-judging

You can read the Local Consumer Review Survey Results here in its entirety for expert analysis and additional results from BrightLocal. For easy, almost hands-free reputation management you use ReputationLoop to automatically gather and promote customer reviews and build your five-star reputation.

Free Demo RepLoop

Zach_Color_Trans_small_CroppedAbout The Author

Zach Anderson is the co-founder of Reputation Loop (helping small businesses grow by generating customer feedback and online reviews) who loves online marketing and golf.

The post LOCAL CONSUMER REVIEW SURVEY: Customers Will Leave Review If Asked appeared first on Reputation Loop.

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